Caladoc grapes

Caladoc is a dark-skinned wine grape variety, first produced in 1958 when ampelographer Paul Truel crossed Malbec with Grenache. The variety is characterized by its dark red coloring, medium-to-high tannins and medium-to-full body. Though this description may sound more like Malbec, Caladoc was originally intended to be more akin to Grenache, but with less susceptibility to coulure (a poor fruit-set condition).

It is not sanctioned in any of France’s AOCs, and typically only used in VDP/IGP blends of the Languedoc and Provence. Outside France, Caladoc is grown in Estremadura, Portugal and Mendoza, Argentina.

Examples of varietal Caladoc are uncommon, but some examples do exist, typically in rosé form. In blended wines, Caladoc offers plenty of color with flavors and aromas of wild berries, balsamic and eucalyptus.

Caladoc is a dark-skinned wine grape variety, first produced in 1958 when ampelographer Paul Truel  crossed Malbec with Grenache. The variety is characterized by its dark red coloring, medium-to-high tannins and medium-to-full body. Though this description may sound more like Malbec, Caladoc was originally intended to be more akin to Grenache, but with less susceptibility to coulure (a poor fruit-set condition).

It is not sanctioned in any of France’s AOCs, and typically only used in VDP/IGP blends of the Languedoc and Provence. Outside France, Caladoc is grown in Estremadura, Portugal and Mendoza, Argentina.

Examples of varietal Caladoc are uncommon, but some examples do exist, typically in rosé form. In blended wines, Caladoc offers plenty of color with flavors and aromas of wild berries, balsamic and eucalyptus.